September 18, 2021

The glossary of European project design – part 1

Very often the limited knowledge of the terminology typical of the European tenders and programs can be a limit to the identification, by the interested parties, of financing opportunities appropriate to their own activities, thus representing an obstacle to the presentation of competitive project proposals coherent with the requests of the announcements.

Understanding the meaning of the key terms of the European project therefore becomes essential to face a conscious, effective and strategic planning process, which allows to correctly interpret the provisions of the European notice and to use, during the drafting phase of the project proposal, a language suitable to respond adequately to the assessor’s expectations.

It’s therefore necessary to speak the same language, and there is nothing more useful than a glossary to always keep at hand!

Let’s start to know the meaning of the terms from A to L …

Objective analysis: It’s a schematized representation in the form of a diagram that illustrates its resources and aims. It is always elaborated after a detailed analysis of the problems.

Cost/benefit analysis:
It allows to evaluate the advantages and the effects of a project, verifying if with the realization of the intervention the interested groups get a benefit or a net cost.

Problem analysis:
This is the first step in designing an intervention and consists in identifying the problems in a given situation.

Risk analysis:
Analysis or estimation of factors that influence or could influence the achievement of the objectives of a project intervention.

Activity or action:
Part of the work to be done during the project.
It is characterized by duration, cost and set of resources.

Call for proposal: It’s a formal document with which the European Commission invites to submit proposals/projects and establishes the criteria and methods of granting the funds, as well as the requirements of public and/or private subjects that can access them. These invitations are published in the GUCE series C (Official Journal of the European Community).

Direct beneficiaries: People who, thanks to the relationship with the target group, are reached by the specific objective. The beneficiaries of the loans must always fall into the categories provided for the eligible subjects.

Indirect beneficiaries: Subjects who, thanks to the existing relationship with the direct beneficiaries, are indirectly achieved by the specific objective and/or directly by the general objective.

Good practices: Examples of successful projects (or initiatives). Their function is to show the concrete achievement of the objectives set within the European programs, thus becoming useful points of reference for those who decide to start new projects.

Co-financing: Financing procedure that provides for the economic participation of the applicant, which is added to the financing of the paying agency and contributes to forming the final cost.

Direct costs: Costs incurred by the beneficiary of a Community grant linked directly to the implementation of the project.

Indirect costs: Costs not directly linked to the implementation of the project and incurred independently of the implementation of the project (for example: administration costs, office equipment, postage, telephone costs, etc.).

Time schedule: Schedule of the activities planned within the project and indicates the stages of the project implementation phases, both in terms of time duration and of succession of the actions.

Recipient: Natural or legal persons who benefit not only from the financing but also from the actions put in place and from the concrete results deriving from the specific action.

Dissemination: Dissemination of the results obtained from carrying out the project

Effectiveness: Ability to achieve the set objectives.

Efficiency: Relationship between means used and results achieved.

Eligibility: Project correspondence with the fundamental requisites required by the announcement.

Form: Scheme to be filled in to participate in a call for tenders, generally composed of: database of the proposer, description of the project, financial plan and dissemination plan.

GANNT: Describes the chronological development of the activity program

Grant: Direct financial contribution to finance an action intended to promote the realization of a European Union policy objective or the functioning of a body that pursues an aim of general European interest.

Impact: Indicates the influence of the project in the context of reference and its contribution to achieving the objectives of European policies.

Indicators: Qualitative or numerical descriptors used to measure the achievement of results.

Lead partner: Partner chosen to present the project proposal: it’s the contact person of the funding body who will guarantee the management of the project budget and will be the manager and coordinator of all related activities. The contractual responsibility for the project falls on them.

Related Posts

European project design: 3 main tools to write a successful project

October 22, 2019

October 22, 2019

Organizing focusing on ideas to achieve the set goals are the main steps to develop good design skills, fundamental to...

10 tips for successfully completing the Erasmus + KA1 Staff form

March 12, 2020

March 12, 2020

Thanks to the Key Action 1 Staff envisaged for the Erasmus + Program for 2020, each school can present mobility...

Discover INTERGEN, the project designed to develop an innovative approach in intergenerational education

July 26, 2021

July 26, 2021

INTERGEN is a Strategic Partnership Project for Adult Education, KA2 – Cooperation for Innovation and Exchange of Good Practices of...

4 tips to write the right budget for an Erasmus+ project

February 21, 2020

February 21, 2020

When applying for a mobility project abroad, it’s necessary to pay close attention to the drafting of the budget, in...

European project design: 10 tips to write a successful project

November 25, 2019

November 25, 2019

Writing an effective European mobility project represents a compelling challenge to be faced with motivation and enthusiasm, but without a...

European project design: how to make school an international space for learning, training and education

October 17, 2019

October 17, 2019

In a Europe without borders, protagonist of a ongoing evolution driven by new technologies, by growing globalization and by considerable...

European Project Design: 10 mistakes to avoid

December 17, 2019

December 17, 2019

When it comes to drawing up a project, it is easy to come across a series of mistakes that often...

European Project Design: an international school is a better school. These are the reasons why.

November 4, 2019

November 4, 2019

In a globalized scenario where interculturality represents the added value of a society with an international dimension, the school world...

Playing 4 Soft Skills: how to activate new competences through game and creativity

November 30, 2020

November 30, 2020

A new adventure has just started for Berlink, our training agency located in Berlin, for Axonforce, our technological partner, and...

The European Project Design glossary|Part II

November 18, 2019

November 18, 2019

Today we continue our discovery of the most used terms in the field of European Project Design. They are fundamental...

European project design: the advantages for teachers and students to participate in a transnational mobility project

May 23, 2019

May 23, 2019

Erasmus generation. It’s the name given to the thousands of young people who every year choose to undertake a period...

Europe on 2 wheels: from Pleven to Motor Valley with the Erasmus+ project to study mechatronics and transports

December 3, 2019

December 3, 2019

The students of the Professional School on Transport in Pleven (Bulgaria) carried out an Erasmus+ project at our Italian agency...

Erasmus+: the most important European training program point by point

January 8, 2020

January 8, 2020

28 EU Member States, 6 non-European countries, more than 4 million participants: these are the figures that make Erasmus the...

European Project Design: how school can put into practice the Europe 2020 strategy through Erasmus+

December 2, 2019

December 2, 2019

Europe 2020 is a ten-year strategy proposed by the European Commission in 2010: the European Union has set ambitious goals...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Newsletter